All posts by Don Matteo

How to Ping Multiple Devices at Once in PowerShell?

Ping a Range of IP Addresses using Windows PowerShell

By pinging an IP range, you can instantly determine if the IP addresses within a range are available and reachable on a windows machine where is capable with Powershell. It also shows you which IPs are connected to a device und which device is currently online.

Launch start or press the Windowskey, then type powershell on the keyboard, select powershell app in the chooser.

Out from the opened powershell run the following two lines one after each other with use copy and paste.

$ping = New-Object System.Net.Networkinformation.Ping
1..10 | % { $ping.send("192.168.10.$_") | where {$_.status -eq "Success"} | Select-Object Address,Status }

  IP range “1..10” Change the start (1) or end (10) to the IP range you want to ping on the network. Note that the last octet figure can’t exceed 255.

The command sends ICMP echo request messages to all IPv4 addresses in this range and wait for echo replies, the output will look similar this.

If you get truncated output then use the command bellow.

10..100 | % { $ping.send("192.168.10.$_") | where {$_.status -eq "Success"} | Select-Object -Property Address,Status | Format-Table -AutoSize }

Remarks

This PowerShell class provides functionality similar to the Ping.exe command line tool. The Ping class sends an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo request message to a remote computer and wait for an ICMP echo reply message from that computer.

Conclusion

This post shows how you can easily scan entire IP subnets or ranges in PowerShell without using additional tools that have to be installed first.

How to scan devices in the IP subnet with Ping

PingScan – Ping a Range of IP Addresses in Network with Linux

If you need to determine which devices are currently connected to the network, there is a simple way using the built-in ping utility running in a Linux For Loop.

Run the following command using ping in a Linux Bash For Loop

$ for i in $(seq 254); do ping -c1 -W1 10.1.1.$i & done | grep from

The output from this IPv4 example looks like this.

64 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.528 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=4.82 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.4: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.046 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.5: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=6.52 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.103: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.295 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.104: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.083 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.105: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.513 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.106: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=1.16 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.110: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.485 ms

Explanation of ping parameters:

  • -c1 number of ping requests (one ping for each address).
  • -W1 time to wait for response (timeout)..

Instead of the Class A subnet shown above, any IPv4 class can be used in the loop, whereby after sec the corresponding number of hosts for an range can be inserted, may depending on what kind of netmask is used.

$ for i in $(seq 99 199); do ping -c1 -W1 10.1.1.$i & done | grep from
64 bytes from 10.1.1.103: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.521 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.104: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.474 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.105: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=3.36 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.106: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=1.37 ms
64 bytes from 10.1.1.110: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.645 ms

  Ping sends an ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) echo request to a probed interface on the network and then waits for a response. After the initiator run a ping command, a ping signal is sent to a specific address. If the destination host receives the echo request, it responds by sending an echo reply packet. Here in this example ping is used to get the ICMP echo replies for a range of addresses using a For Loop applied.

Another useful alternatives to scan a subnet is to use nmap, but this tool is usually not built-in and must first be installed, if using a Debian GNU/Linux-Distribution then run sudo apt install nmap

nmap is a powerful and versatile tool to check security, but here in order not to leave the context, the command with the effect similar to ICMP echo reply results of ping works like this.

$ nmap -T5 -sP 10.1.1.1-254 | grep scan

Conclusion

This post shows how to scan whole ip subnets or ranges in a simple way without using additional tools. there are certainly many other methods and commands, we limit ourselves to a few but useful examples here, may have inspired you! which of course I’m would be happy about.